- IN MEMORIAM -
HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II
ON BANK NOTES

Elizabeth Alexandra Mary of the House of Windsor has been Queen of the United Kingdom from 1952, when she succeeded her father, King George VI, to the throne.
Queen Elizabeth II, as the head of the Commonwealth of Nations, was also Head of State to many countries in the Commonwealth.
Queen Elizabeth's portrait undoubtedly appeared more often on bank notes of Great Britain's colonies, prior to the colonies gaining independence and the use of her portrait was not as common as it once was. However, there are a number of nations who retained her as Head of State and she was still portrayed on the bank notes of numerous countries.

The countries that have used portraits of The Queen are:

    Australia
    Bahamas
    Belize
    Bermuda
    British Caribbean Territories
    British Honduras
    Canada 
    Cayman Islands
    Ceylon
    Cyprus
    East African Currency Board
    East Caribbean States
    Falkland Islands
    Fiji
    Gibraltar
    Great Britain (England)
    Guernsey
    Hongkong
    Isle of Man
    Jamaica
    Jersey
    Malaya and British Borneo
    Malta
    Mauritius
    New Zealand
    Rhodesia & Nyasaland
    Rhodesia
    Saint Helena
    Scotland (Royal Bank of Scotland)
    Seychelles
    Solomon Islands
    Southern Rhodesia
    Trinidad & Tobago 
    Zambia (essay only)

In total, there have been 30 portaits used on the various bank notes bearing the likeness of Queen Elizabeth. This study indentifies the individual portraits and also identifies the numerous varieties of the engravings, which are based on the portraits. The varieties of portraits on the bank notes are due, in the main, to different engravers, but there are some varieties due to different photographs from a photographic session being selected by different printers or issuing authorities.
Portraits used on bank notes come from several sources. Most are official photographs that were distributed regularly by Buckingham Palace for use in the media and in public places. Some of the portraits have been especially commissioned, usually by the issuing authority, although, in the case of the two paintings adapted for use on the notes (Portrait 9 and Portrait 19), it was not the issuing authority that commissioned the paintings. In the case of the portraits used by the Bank of England, a number of the portraits have been drawn by artists without specific reference to any single portrait.

Apart from the portrait of Queen Elizabeth as a young girl on the Canadaian 20-dollar notes of 1935, the earliest portrait used on the bank notes is Portrait 6, which appeared in 1954. The portrait used for the Canadian notes was taken in 1951 when Elizabeth was yet to accede to the throne. Portrait 6 is particularly famous because of the original engraving of 1954 Canadian issues, showed a 'devil's head' in her hair. After causing some embarassment to the Bank of Canada, the image was re-engraved and the notes reprinted. Notes with the modified portrait appeared from 1955.

While there have been some very famous photographers to have taken The Queen's portrait, Dorothy Wilding is the one to have taken most portraits for use on world bank notes. Wilding had been a court photographer for King George VI and many of the images of the King that can be found on bank notes, coins and postage stamps throughout the Commonwealth were copied from her photoghraphs. On the accession of Queen Elizabeth, Wilding was granted the same duty by the new monarch. Shortly after Elizabeth became Queen many photographs of the new monarch were taken by Wilding. These phgotographs were required for images that could be used on coins, stamps, bank notes and for official portraits that could be hung in offices and public places.

Anthony Buckley was another prolific photographer of The Queen, and his work is well represented in the engravings of Her Majesty on the bank notes. Most of Buckley's portraits were taken in the 1960s and 1970s. His work has also been adapted for use on numerous postage stamps throughout the word.

One of the interesting aspects to the portraits of Queen Elizabeth, which appear on world bank notes, is the style of portrait chosen by each issuing authority. How does each issuing authority wish to portray The Queen? Some of the portraits show The Queen in informal attire, the Bank of Canada has always shown The Queen without any regalia and always without a tiara. It has been suggested that this may be due to a desire to appease the French elements of Canada.
Australia originally opted to show Her Manjesty in formal attire. Portrait 5 shows a profile of The Queen wearing the State Diadem and Portrait 12 shows Her Majesty in the regalia of the Order of the Garter. When preparations were being made to commission a portrait for the introduction of decimal currency into Australia, the Chairman of the Currency Note Design Group advised that, for the illustration of The Queen (Portrait 12), the 'General effect is to be regal, rather than "domestic" ...'
However, two recent portraits used on Australian bank notes (Portrait 21 and Portrait 30) show The Queen in informal attire, perhaps even displaying a touch of 'domesticity'. This is possibly a reflection of changing attitudes to the monarchy in Australia.

While Canada and Australia may opt to use informal images of The Queen, most issuing authorities continue to depict Her Majesty regally. In many portraits she is depicted wearing the regalia of the Order of The Garter. In other portraits she is often dressed formally, wearing Her Royal Family Orders. In most portraits she is wearing some of her famous jewelry. In the following descriptions of the portraits, various tiaras, diadems, necklaces and jewelry are described, although not all items have been identified.

Of interest, in the following descriptions, is the differences observed in the same portraits engraved by different security printers. In several instancves the same portrait has been used by different security printers and the rendition of the portrait is noticeably variant for the notes prepared by the different companies. Portrait 4 gives a good example of the different renditions of the Dorothy Wilding portrait by Bradbury Wilkinson, Thomas De La Rue, Waterlow & Sons and Harrisons.

Another example can be seen in Portrait 16, which is used on bank notes issued by Canada and the Solomon Islands. In the engraving used by the Solomon Islands, prepared by Thomas De La Rue, The Queen looks severe, but on the Canadian notes prepared by the British American Bank Note Company there is a suggestion of a smile. The Canadian notes achieve the difference by including a subtle shaded area on Her Majesty's left cheek, just to the right of her mouth.

The following list of portraits is ordered by the date on which the bank notes were first released into circulation. Where the portrait was used by more than one issuing authority, the list of issuing authorities is ordered by date on which they first used the portrait.


Portrait 1
Date - circa 1934
Photographer - Marcus Adams; official photographer of the Royal children
CANADA

The portrait of Princess Elizabeth appeared on the Canadian 20-dollar note from 1935. The note was issued with English text (P-46) and French text (P47).

The image on the bank notes was engraved by Edwin Gunn who was employed by the Canadian Bank Note Company.


Portrait 2
Date - 1952
Photographer - Dorothy Wilding; court photographer
BERMUDA
CYPRUS

This early portrait of the Queen is believed to have been adapted from one of the photographs taken slightly earlier or shortly after the death of her father.
The portrait appears to have been taken specifically for coins and postage stamps which traditionally show the profile of the monarch.

However, some bank note designs by Thomas de La Rue had previously used the profiles of King George V and King George VI, and the profile of Her Majesty was required to continue the use of these designs.


Portrait 3
Date - 1952
Photographer - Dorothy Wilding; court photographer
Her Majesty is wearing Queen Mary's "Girls of Great Britain and Ireland" Tiara, which was given to the future Queen Mary as a wedding gift in 1893.
The funds for the purchase of the Tiara were raised by a committee formed by Lady Eve Greville. The tiara was purchased from Garrard, the London jeweller.
Portrait 3a Portrait 3b
CEYLON

This portrait, used by the Ceylonese notes and prepared by Bradbury Wilkinson, has a distinct parting of the Her Majesty's hair. In depicting her lips there is a slight distortion, which exaggerates her mouth
(particularly when compared to Portrait 3b).

JAMAICA

This image of Her Majesty by Thomas De La Rue is more pleasing to the eye than the Bradbury Wilkinson engraving. A less distinct parting of the hair, a better depiction of her lips, and adjustments to shading improve the appearance of Queen Elizabeth.

 


Portrait 4
Date - 1952
Photographer - Dorothy Wilding; court photographer
While this portrait has several varieties, each variety is copied from a photograph taken by Dorothy Wilding during a single portrait sitting shortly after Elizabeth became monarch. This portrait is the most frequently used image of Queen Elizabeth on world bank notes. The Queen is wearing the George IV State Diadem, created for the coronation of George IV in 1820. Designed with symbols of the rose, thistle and shamrock, the Diadem contains 1,333 diamonds. Queen Elizabeth often wears the Diadem on state occasions. The necklace worn by The Queen, of diamond flowers and leaves, was a wedding present from the Nizam of Hyderabad and Berar.
Portrait 4a Portrait 4b
BERMUDA
HONGKONG
BRITISH HONDURAS
BRITISH CARIBBEAN TERRITORIES
MAURITIUS
SOUTHERN RHODESIA
CYPRUS
RHODESIA & NYASALAND
FIJI
BELIZE

The most common variety of this portrait is the engraving prepared by Bradbury Wilkinson. This variety of the portrait is distinguished by the heavy shading on Her Majesty's right cheek and the tilt of the head.
Minor differences may be found in the tilt of her head in a number of engravings.

BAHAMAS
MALTA

The second variety of this portrait, which appears on the notes of The Bahamas and Malta, was designed by Thomas De La Rue. It has less shading on the right cheek and The Queen's head does not have the tilt apparant ion the Bradbury Wilkinson portrait.

 

Portrait 4c Portrait 4d
MALAYA AND BRITISH BORNEO

The portrait on the issues of Malaya and British Borneo, prepared by Waterlow & Sons, provides a third variety of the Portrait. Similar to the Bradbury Wilkinson portrait, this engraving has clearer lines and the tilt of the head is less distinct.

EAST AFRICA

This engraving, used only on the notes of the East African Currency Board, is distinct because of the depiction of the eyes of Her Majesty.
Appearing slightly more closed than on the other varieties of this portrait, Her eyes seem to be fixed on an object in the distance. This engraving was prepared by Thomas De La Rue.

 

Portrait 4e
ZAMBIA

This portrait has been prepared by Harrisons, the British security printers who are better known for their business printing postage stamps.
It appears on an essay for Zambia and was never released into circulation.


Portrait 5
Date - 1952
Photographer - Dorothy Wilding; court photographer
AUSTRALIA

This bas-relief profile of The Queen, wearing the George IV State Diadem and surrounded by Hakea leaves, is used on the Australian 1-pound note issued in 1953. The note was designed by the Note Printing Branch of the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, with assistance from their artist Napier Waller and the sculptor Leslie Bowles.
The plaster image for the portrait of the Queen was sculptured by Dorothy Wilding.
 


Portrait 6
Date - 1951
Photographer - Yousuf Karsh (Quebec)
This portrait is based on a photograph by Yousuf Karsh. It was one of many taken during a photographic session in 1951, a year before Queen Elizabeth's accession to the throne. Many of the portraits from the photographic session show The Queen wearing a tiara, but the particular photograph chosen by the Bank of Canada for its 1954 issue is one without.
The necklace of diamond flowers and leaves, was a wedding present from the Nizam of Hyderabad and Berar. The image on the bank notes was engraved by the British American Bank Note Company.
This portrait is famous for its two varieties.
Portrait 6a Portrait 6b
CANADA

The first variety of this engraving incorprates a 'devil's head" in The Queen's hair.

CANADA

The second variety of the engraving is modified to remove the offending pattern in Her Majesty's hair.


Portrait 7
Date - 1952
Photographer - Dorothy Wilding; court photographer
SEYCHELLES
FALKLAND ISLANDS

This profile of The Queen might be regarded as a portrait specifically prepared for use in coins, which traditionally show the profile the monarch.
However, the issuing authorities that chose to use this portrait had previously used profiles of King George V and King George VI.
In order to maintain the Thomas De La Rue designs into the reign of Elizabeth II, it was necessary to have a suitable profile of Her Majesty.


Portrait 8
Date - 1954
Photographer - Dorothy Wilding; court photographer
Although not widely used, this portrait is regarded as one of ther more flattering ones of Her Majesty.
The Queen is wearing the George IV State Diadem and the diamond necklace that was a wedding gift rom the Nizam of Hyderabad and Berar.
Portrait 8a Portrait 8b
EAST AFRICA
JAMAICA
BAHAMAS

This portrait shows Her Majesty with bare shoulders and deep neckline on the notes of Jamaica and The Bahamas, but on the notes of the East African Currency Board her shoulders and neckline are not apparent. The notes of Jamaica and The Bahamas depict Her Majesty in her most feminine aspect.
In these portraits she is a woman first and Queen second. However, the beauty of Her Majesty in these images has been enhanced by the engraver. The original portrait, while very flattering, represents Her Majesty in a more regal aspect and with, perhaps, less distinct facial features.

SCOTLAND (RBS)

This portrait was used on The Royal Bank of Scotland's five-pound note, isued to commemorate Her Majesty's Golden Jubilee in 2002.
The adaptation of the image on the commemorative note is not as pleasing as the image on the earlier notes and the later engraving could be mistaken as being copied from a completely different portrait. It is certainly a very different variety of the portrait.

 


Portrait 9
Date - 1956
Photographer - Pietro Annigoni
This widely used portrait is adapted from a painting by Pietro Annigoni. The portrait was privately commissioned by the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers in 1954, but not completed until 1956.
The painting is now displayed in Fishmongers' Hall, London.
The full length portrait features Her Majesty wearing the Regalia of the Order of the Garter, standing regally with a distant but lonely aspect.
The portrait is regarded by many as one of the finest portrayals of the young Queen.
Portrait 9a Portrait 9b
ISLE OF MAN
MALTA
RHODESIA
TRINIDAD & TOBAGO
SEYCHELLES

This is the Bradbury Wilkinson version of the portrait. The distinguishing features are the even shading on the side of The Queen's face, below her temple, and the distinct highlights given to the braid on the front of Her cloak, which originates from the bow on Her left shoulder.

JERSEY
EAST CARIBBEAN STATES
MAURITIUS
FIJI

This is the De La Rue version of the portrait. In this version, the darker shading on the side of The Queen's face below her temple has a distinct edge, highlighting her cheekbone. In addition, the braid on her cloak is drawn more simply and regularly.

 


Portrait 10
Date - circa 1960
Artist
- Robert Austin
ENGLAND

This is the first portrait of a monarch to appear on a bank note issued by the Bank of England.
It was drawn by Robert Austin, who was responsible for designing the 10-shilling and 1-pound notes of the "C" series notes issued by the Bank of England.
Austin commenced his portrait by obtaining photographs of Her Majesty at a session in Buckingham Palace on 1st May 1956. The photographs were taken by a senior assistant of Dorothy Wilding.
However, the final drawing by Austin was not based on a specific photograph from this session, - it was a composite of a number of sources.
The vignette shows Her Majesty wearing the George IV State Diadem, Queen Victoria's Collet Necklace, Queen Mary's Floret Earrings, and Queen Mary's Dorset Bow Brooch.
The necklace which was left to the Crown by Queen Victoria in 1901, contains diamonds taken from a Garter badge and a ceremonial sword. The pear-shaped stone on the necklace is known as the Lahore Diamond.
The Dorset Bow Brooch was made by Carrington and Company and presented as a wedding gift to Queen Mary in 1893 by the County of Dorset. Queen Mary gave the brooch to Princess Elizabeth as a wedding present in 1947.

The engraving of Austin's portrait was executed by R. Godbehear of Bradbury Wilkinson. There was widespread criticism of the portrait when the notes were issued.


Portrait 11
Date - circa 1963
Artist
- Reynlods Stone
ENGLAND

Following the disappointment over Robert Austin's portrait of The Queen (Portrait 10), the Bank of England decided to prepare a new portrait for the higher denomination notes in their "C" series.
This portrait was drawn by Reynolds Stone, wo was responsible for the design of the 5- and 10-pound notes of the "C" series.
The engraving of the portrait was executed by Alan Dow of Bradbury Wilkinson.
Austin's portrait depicts Her Majesty wearing the George IV State Diadem and a necklace of three matched strings of pearls, her preferred choice of necklace for informal and semi-formal occasions.

The Queen had three different three-row pearl necklaces: One was made at the time of her accession from pearls in the possession of her family, one is a present from the Amir of Qatar on the occasion of her coronation in 1953, and the third is a gift from King George V, presented to Elizabeth at the time of the King's Silver Jubilee, on 6th May 1935.


Portrait 12
Date - circa 1964
Photographer - Douglas Glass
AUSTRALIA

Wearing the robes and Regalia of the Order of the Garter, this portrait of Her Majesty is based on a photograph taken by Douglas Glass of London.
The photograph was especially commissioned by the Reserve Bank of Australia to provide a portrait from which an engraving could be made for inclusion on the 1-dollar note introduced in 1966. The 1-dollar note was designed by Mr. Gordon Andrews.
The Queen is wearing Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee necklace and this is one of very few portraits to show Her Majesty wearing a necklace beneath the robes of the Order of the Garter. She is also wearing Queen Alexandra's Cluster Earrings. The earrings, created by the jeweller Garrard, were a wedding gift from the future King Edward VII to his bride, Alexandra of Denmark.


Portrait 13
Date - circa 1960
Photographer - Anthony Buckley
NEW ZEALAND
BERMUDA
CAYMAN ISLANDS
JERSEY
BELIZE

This portrait of Her Majesty is adapted from a photograph taken prior to a Royal Tour to India and Pakistan and it is one of the more widely used images of The Queen.
Her Majesty is shown wearing Queen Alexandra's Kokoshnik Tiara, the King George VI Festoon Necklace, and Queen Mary's Floret Earrings.
The Kokoshnik Tiara, which is sometimes known as the Russian Fringe Tiara, was designed in the style of a Russian girl's headdress. The design was based on a similar tiara owned by Queen Alexandra's sister, The Empress of Russia. Created by Garrard, the tiara has sixty-one platinum bars set with 488 diamonds. The tiara was presented to Queen Alexandra, while still a princess, on the occasion of her silver wedding anniversary. It was a gift from three hundred and sixty-five peeresses of the realm.
The Festoon Necklace was created from one hundred and five diamonds, at the request of King George VI, from diamonds he inherited on becoming King.


Portrait 14
Date - circa 1968
Artist - Harry Eccleston

Like the previous portraits of The Queen, which had been drawn for the bank notes of the Bank of England, this likeness of Her Majesty is not based on an existing portrait. The master drawing of The Queen was executed by Harry Eccleston, the designer of the Bank's "D" series.

Portrait 14a Portrait 14b
ENGLAND

This version of the portrait was used on the 10-, 20- and 50-pound notes of the "D" series.
The Queen is depicted in state robes, wearing the George IV State Diadem, Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee Necklace and Queen Alexandra's Cluster Earrings.
The necklace was bought from funds donated by the "Women of the British Empire' to celebrate Queen Victoria's fifty years on the throne.
It was presented to Queen Victoria on 24th June 1887.

ENGLAND

In this version of the portrait of The Queen is depicted wearing the robes of the Order of the Garter, the George IV State Diadem and Queen Alexandra's Cluster Earrings. This portrait appears on the 1-pound and 5-pound notes of the Bank of England's "D" series.

 


Portrait 15
Date - circa 1966
Photographer - Anthony Buckley
The portraits in this group are official portraits taken by Anthony Buckley. On this portrait The Queen is wearing Queen Victoria's Collet Necklace and Earrings.
While this necklace is depicted in Portrait 10, the matching earrings are not used for that portrait.
The drops of the earrings are stones taken from the timur Ruby Necklace, owned by The Queen.
Also apparent in the portrait, as a blue sash to which are attached the two Royal Family Orders given to Her Majesty. The first Royal Family Order was introduced by King George IV and Family Orders have been issued by each of his successors. The Orders are worn by female members of the Royal Family. Queen Elizabeth wears the Royal Family Order of her father, King George VI, above the Order of her Grandfather, King George V.
In this portrait. the Royal Family Order of King George V has been truncated.
Portrait 15a
ISLE OF MAN
SAINT HELENA

The first version of this portrait can be distinguished by the angle of Her Majesty's head, which is squarely set.
This portrait was initially used by Bradbury Wilkinsin, but later used by De La Rue when they took over the preparation of the notes.

Portrait 15b Portrait 15c
FIJI

This variation of the portrait appears on modified Fijian notes prepared by De La Rue. It is distinct from the other varieties of this portrait in that Her Majesty is looking straight ahead.

FIJI

This portrait on the Fijian notes shows Her Majesty's head at a slightly different angle to the images used on the issued by the Iale of Man and St. Helena. The difference, not always distinct, can be seen in the slight change of angle of Her Majesty's head. The notes on which this image is used were prepared by Bradbury Wilkinson.

 


Portrait 16
Date - circa 1962
Photographer - Anthony Buckley
This portrait depicts Queen Elizabeth in an evening dress, wearing a diamond necklace and diamond earrings. The diamond necklace was presented to Elizabeth in April 1947, while she was still a princess, as a gift from the people of South Africa.
The necklace was originally constructed with twenty-one large diamonds, connected by links that contained two small brilliant-cut diamonds mounted to either side of a baguette diamond.
Shortly after Elizabeth ascended the throne, she had the necklace shortened to fifteen large stones, with the remaining stones being made into a matching bracelet. The necklace worn in this portrait is the shortened version.
The earrings are Queen Mary's Cluster Earrings, with each earring holding a large brilliant-cut diamond set in platinnum and surrounded by two circles of small diamonds.
Portrait 16a Portrait 16b
CANADA

The engraving of this portrait, which was used for the Canadian 1- and 2- dollar notes issued in 1973 and for the 20-dollar notes issued in 1969 and 1979, was executed by George Gundersen of the British American Bank Note Company.

SOLOMON ISLANDS

The notes of the Solomon Islands were prepared by Thomas De La Rue and this portrait is slightly different to the engraving prepared for the Canadian notes.
The De La Rue image uses finer lines in the shading of the face and The Queen looks a little more severe than in the Canadian notes.

 


Portrait 17
Date - 1977
Photographer - Peter Grugeon
This portrait of The Queen is based on a photograph by Peter Grugeon, taken at the time of Her Majesty's Silver Jubilee in 1977, and it is one of the more popular images of The Queen.
Her Majesty is depicted wearing Grand Duchess Vladimir's tiara and Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee necklace. The tiara was smuggled out of Russia during the Russian Revolution and is now owned by The Queen.
In most renditions of this portrait, the Royal Family Order of King George VI is apparent below the left-hand shoulder of Her Majesty, while the uppermost portion of the Royal Family Order of King George V is apparent in only some renditions of the portrait.
Portrait 17a Portrait 17b
NEW ZEALAND
ISLE OF MAN

Bradbury Wilkinson's version of this portrait has less shading on The Queen's neck just above her necklace, than is apparent on the De La Rue engravings (Portrait 17b).
There are other subtle variations to the second version, noticeably in the pattern of Her Majesty's dress.

FALKLAND ISLANDS
BAHAMAS
EAST CARIBBEAN STATES
BELIZE
BERMUDA
CAYMAN ISLANDS

The De La Rue engraving, as well as reflecting the differences mentioned in portrait 17a, also represents The Queen with a more cheerful aspect, achieving this through slight differences around Her eyes and lips.

 


Portrait 18
Date - 1984
Photographer - Anthony Buckley
CANADA

This is one of the most informal portraits of Queen Elizeabeth to be used on any bank note, and it is also one of the most flattering  of the mature monarch.
The engraved portrait used on the Canadian bank notes was executed by Henry S. Doubtfire of Thomas De La Rue.
Adapted from an official portrait by Anthony Buckley in 1984, the engraving shows Queen Elizabeth wearing a dress with a plain neckline and wearing the necklace of three matched strings of pearls.


Portrait 19
Date - 1978
Artist - Normal Hepple
JERSEY

This portrain of The Queen is copied from a painting by Norman Hepple and it is one of very few engraved images of Her Majesty to have been copied from a painting.
The portrait, which shows Her Majetsy attired in the Regalia of the Order of the Garter, was commissioned by the States of Jersey.
The original painting hangs in the entrance to the Jersey States Chamber in the States Building, St. Helier, Jersey.


Portrait 20
Date - 1985-1986
Photographer - Don Ford

ENGLAND

In preparation for the "E" series of notes issued by the Bank of England, photographs of The Queen were especially commissioned by the Bank.
The photographs were taken by Don Ford, one of the Banks technical photographers, under the direction of Roger Withington, who designed the notes and prepared the engraving.
The portrait shows Queen Elizabeth wearing Queen Mary's "Girl's of Great Britain and Ireland"' Tiara, Queen Alexandra's cluster earrings and, although difficult to identify, Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee Necklace.
The "Girls of Britain and Ireland" Tiara can be worn with or without a bandeau base and in this portrait the tiara is set into its base.

Portrait 3 shows the Tiara being worn without the base.

 


Portrait 21
Date - 1984
Photographer - John Lawrence
AUSTRALIA

his informal protrait of The Queen appears on the 5-dollar note issued in Australia from July 1992.
Her Majesty is shown wearing a simple dress, a string of pearls (that had come to Queen Victoria from her Hanoverian inheritance) and Queen Alexandra's Cluster Earrings.
The 5-dollar bank note was designed by Mr. Bruce Stewart and the portrait of Her Majesty by John Lawrence.
The portrait was commissioned by the Reserve Bank of Australia in 1984 and The Queen gave her approval for its use on an Australian note in 1988.


Portrait 22
Date - 1986
Photographer - Ronald Woolf
NEW ZEALAND

This engraving is from an official portrait of Her Majesty, taken at Government House, Wellington, New Zealand, on 26th February 1986 by Ronald Woolf.
In this portrait, Her Majesty is wearing Grand Duchess Vladimir's Tiara, Queen Mary's drop earrings,
Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee Necklace, and the Sovereign's Badge of the Queen's Service Order, an order unique to New Zealand.


Portrait 23
Date - 1992
Photographer - Terry O'Neill
This image of The Queen is based in an official photograph taken by Terry O'Neill.
The Royal Family Order of King George VI is apparent on the left hand shoulder of Her Majesty in most engravings of this portrait, while the uppermost portion of the Royal Family Order of King George V is visible in the engraving on some bank notes.
The Tiara, representing a wreath of flowers, is made of diamonds and Burmese rubies. It was commissioned by the Queen in 1973 and manufactured by Garrard, the London jewellers, from stones in her private collection.
The Burmese people gave Her Majesty a gift of ninety-six rubies set in gold as a wedding gift and Her Majesty later decided to use these stones, plus some of her diamonds, to create a tiara and earrings. The matching earrings, of rubies and diamonds, form small flowers that complement the floral form of the tiara and are worn by The Queen in this portrait.
The diamonds used in the tiara and earrings came from a tiara given to Her Majesty as part of her wedding gift by the Nizam of Hyderabad and Berar.
The origin of the necklace in this portrait is unknown.
Portrait 23a Portrait 23b
GIBRALTAR
GUERNSEY
BERMUDA

SAINT HELENA

This interpretation of Terry O'Neill's photograph was engraved by Alan Dow of De La Rue for bank notes designed by that company.
This version of the portrait shows The Queen with an elongated face and full eyebrows.

BAHAMAS

This version of the portrait was prepared by the British American Bank Note Company. In this portrait the Queen appears to have a rounder face and narrow eyebrows.
This image, unlike the De La Rue image, also suggests The Queen has forced her smile.

 


Portrait 24
Date - circa 2001
Artist - unkown
SCOTLAND (RBS)

This is one of the two portraits of Her Majesty to appear on the back of The Royal Bank of Scotland's 5-pound note, which commemorates The Queen's Golden Jubilee.
She is depicted in a casual, happy mood.
The images of Her Majesty on the back of the 5-pound commemorative note are the only images of Her Majessty to appear on the back of a bank note.
It is understood that this image of The Queen is not based on one particular portrait, rather the artist combined elements from a number of pictures to produce the final result.


Portrait 25
Date - 2000
Artist - Charles Green

CANADA

The photograph, from which this engraving es executed, was commissioned by the Queen's representatives at Buckingham Palace. It was specifically requested by the Bank of Canada for the production of its 20-dollar note introduced in September 2004. The engraving on the bank note was prepared by Mr. Jorge Perral, Artistic Director for the Canadian Bank Note Company. The creative design was led by the Canadian Bank Note Company in cooperation with BA International. Both companies have printed notes for the Bank of Canada since its inception in 1935.

This is one of the most attractive portraits of the mature Queen and its rendition on the 20-dollar note maintains  the Bank of Canada's reputation of using the better portraits of Queen Elizabeth.

For this portrait, Her Majesty is informally attired in a plain dress and wearing one of her favored three-row pearl necklaces.

 


Portrait 26
Date - 2007
Artist - unkown
FIJI

In this portrait, Her Majesty is wearing Grand Duchess Vladimir's Tiara
 


Portrait 27
Date - 2010
Artist - unkown
GIBRALTAR

Portrait 28
Date - 2012
Artist - Chris Levine (Canada)
JERSEY

 

In this portrait of The Queen is depicted wearing the George IV State Diadem.


Portrait 29
Date - 2012
Artist - unkown
CANADA

 

The engraving shows Queen Elizabeth wearing a dress with a plain neckline and wearing the necklace of three matched strings of pearls.


Portrait 30
Date - 2016
Artist - John Lawrence
AUSTRALIA

 

The engraving shows Queen Elizabeth wearing a dress with a plain neckline and wearing the necklace of three matched strings of pearls.


Portrait - various
Date - 2012
Artist - various
SCOTLAND (RBS)

Various portraits
showing H.M. The Queen in 1952 and 2012 on the Royal Bank of Scotland's 2012 commemorative 10-Pounds note (Diamond Jubilee)


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